At first from New Jersey, Casey and her partner, Dr. Alan Dow, satisfied as undergraduates at the College of Virginia, in which she graduated in 1994. They each went to Washington University in St. Louis, where by she attended legislation faculty and he went into clinical university. They moved to Richmond in 2000 for her husband’s residency at VCU Medical Centre.

Casey has labored at the U.S. attorney’s place of work in Richmond and for the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, and she commenced as an adjunct professor at the UR College of Legislation faculty in 2003. She turned the initial director of the freshly created Carrico Middle at the legislation university in 2007.

Casey would like to hook up regulation pupils with the pro bono support group in the Richmond spot. She reported pupils want to be of assistance, but several really feel helpless.

“They could see what was sickening our culture, but they couldn’t determine out how to aid it mend,” she claimed.

“I constantly felt like the presents that we get in regulation school — our knowledge, our schooling — are kinds that we should really reward to other folks to assistance our modern society,” Casey stated.

She stated that in numerous prison issues, there is a ideal to an lawyer, but in civil matters there is not. Learners get the job done in many locations including relatives, housing and immigration regulation.

Mainly because they are not nevertheless attorneys, they can’t deliver immediate illustration. Rather, Casey stated, they function with law firm/associates from the Central Virginia Legal Support Modern society, the Virginia Poverty Legislation Center and the Legal Support Justice Centre.