WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. – The Navajo Country has made a decision a clearer, lawful definition for cannabis really should be presented to tribal customers and people dwelling on the reservation.

On Oct. 5, Nez signed into regulation Resolution CS-76-20, which amends the Navajo Country Felony Code to explain this definition of cannabis, and to make it possible for for the civil forfeiture of residence, for persons uncovered liable for offenses connected to the possession, producing, transportation, sale, use, trade, or shipping and delivery of marijuana. The new provisions also demand Navajo Country officers convicted of violating marijuana offenses to forfeit work or elected business.

Less than the definitions of “controlled substances,” cannabis is now described as “all elements of the plant cannabis sativa L., whether or not increasing or not the seeds thereof the resin extracted from any part of these types of plant and each individual compound, manufacture, salt, spinoff, mixture, or planning of this sort of plant, its seeds or resin, that contains any amount of money of delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol. This sort of expression excludes any part of the plant cannabis sativa L., whether developing or not, with a delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than .3 % on a dry bodyweight basis made or delivered in accordance with an industrial hemp regulatory procedure accepted by the Navajo Nation Council or pursuant to the pilot undertaking made by CJN-24-19 and any extensions.”

The Nation hopes that this definition will enable clarify the legality of cannabis on the reservation.

“With this resolution, we are sending a apparent information to all Navajo Nation inhabitants and website visitors, officers, and individuals in elected workplace that you will be held accountable for possessing, production, transporting, providing, employing, buying and selling, and providing cannabis on the Navajo Country,” explained Navajo Country President Jonathan Nez. “We will continue on to stand up for our communities from those who try to circumvent and manipulate our guidelines.”

With 16 supporting votes and 5 opposing, the Navajo Nation Council accepted the new amendments to the Navajo Nation Felony Code on Sept. 24.

Info provided by the Business office of the President and Vice President